Archive for June 12th, 2011

12th June
2011
written by amber

Assorted Fallings From the Air

1. The men picked an inconvenient time to fall from the air. Although the primitives on Anu-Tako had never seen parachutes before, they seemed to have been anticipating drop-ins. The men had expected to be lauded as supernatural beings. How were they to know that they’d land at the culmination of a week-long ceremony during which the starving islanders had endlessly entreated the gods of the clouds to send them sustenance?

2. The men picked an inconvenient time to fall from the air. The teenage worker at Bungee Mega-Extreme had just finished rigging the cords for a dual jump for him and his girlfriend, planning for their heads to simultaneously kiss the ground as he proposed marriage to her. Flustered by the two customers’ unexpected arrival in the middle of a slow day, the young man neglected to re-set the cords, thus causing Brian and Fred to do far more than kiss the earth at the nadir of their jump.

3. ┬áThe men picked an inconvenient time to fall from the air. After setting the record for the longest glide across the skies of Saskatchewan and losing altitude quickly, they sighted the abandoned – yet intact – air field which was their intended destination. Unfortunately, on that particular Saturday the locals had chosen to use the air field for the largest flea market ever held in their province.

4. The men picked an inconvenient time to fall from the air. Retrorockets blazing, they entered the atmosphere of the planet and hurtled toward the ground, landing on the shore of a sea of primordial soup, crushing the first and only prototype of the life that would not go on to develop and thrive as it might have otherwise.

The Story 365 project is a year-long marathon of short story writing, with a new story posted every day on this website from May 1, 2011 – April 30, 2012. Stories must be a minimum of 200 words. Please help me by adding first line suggestions in the Comment section.

This is the second story inspired by the first line of a story in Asimov’s September 2010 issue, this one by Benjamin Crowell.